Author Archives: dashea2014

About dashea2014

A Law Librarian with extensive experience in general legal and court libraries. Editor of the Australian Law Librarian for 4.5 years (2008-2012) and active member of Law Libraries Tasmania. Special topics - Tasmanian legislation and case law. A passion for maintaining access to print resources.

Thomas Bigge’s view of education in Van Diemen’s Land

Thomas Bigge’s view of education in Van Diemen’s LandDraft In 1785 Britain had to face the dilemma of what to do with the convicts it had been sending to the American colonies from 1718 to 1785. It is estimated that … Continue reading

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Lieutenant Governor Sorell revives interest in Public Education

Within months of his arrival in Hobart Town in 1817, Lieutenant Governor William Sorell set about improving the overall status of education in the colony. At that time, no government educational institutions existed though there were a few private schools … Continue reading

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Early Moves towards Government Support

From the mid-18th century, politicians and reformers were starting to look at ways of broadening access to education to include all levels of society. Derek Gillard’s Education in England: a History Chapter 5 provides a useful timeline, and list of … Continue reading

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Sir John Franklin – Explorer

Sir John Franklin was the fifth lieutenant governor of Van Diemen’s Land, replacing Sir George Arthur who had administered the Colony for twelve years from 1824 to 1836. Arthur had no doubts about the nature of his responsibilities: first and … Continue reading

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Address of Sir John Franklin to Legislative Council 1837

On Friday 14th July 1837, the Hobart Town Courier reported on the first meeting of the Legislative Council that had taken place in Hobart four days earlier. At 1 o’clock the Lieutenant Governor, Sir John Franklin, took the Chair and … Continue reading

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Changing the Guard

When Sir John Franklin arrived in Van Diemen’s Land to take up the position of Lieutenant Governor in January 1837, the shadow of twelve year’s autocratic rule by Sir George Arthur loomed ominously over the future administration of the Island. … Continue reading

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Proclamation 5 January 1837

Three days before the departure of Lieutenant Governor Arthur from Hobart on 31 October 1836, Lieutenant-Colonel Kenneth Snodgrass arrived from Sydney to take up the position of interim acting lieutenant governor until the arrival of Sir John Franklin. He was … Continue reading

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English Maritime Explorers

Captain James Cook Captain James Cook undertook three Pacific voyages during his service with the Royal Navy. The first voyage was a joint venture between the Royal Society and the Admiralty, and its stated aim was to expand the scientific … Continue reading

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The legal system 1803-1832

Colonial Office Instructions on treatment of natives From 1788, when the First Fleet arrived in Port Jackson to set up a penal colony for convicts sentenced to transportation, governors and lieutenant governors had quite specific instructions on how they were … Continue reading

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Martial Law – Van Diemen’s Land 1828-1832

Background Colonial correspondence from the Colonial Office to the first four Lieutenant Governors in Van Diemen’s Land (Collins, Davey, Sorell and Arthur) stressed the need to conciliate with the native population of Van Diemen’s Land. A letter to Collins stated … Continue reading

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